Eva Amurri Shares A Traumatic Parenting Moment & Shares Anxiety Struggles

Actress (and Susan Sarandon's daughter) Eva Amurri took to her lifestyle website Happily Eva After to share a traumatic experience her family went through over the holiday season, and her painful experience with shame and anxiety.


In a blog post titled “The Struggle Is Real” Amurri recounts her Night Nurse falling asleep while holding her infant son, Major, causing him to slip from her grasp and fall to the floor, cracking his skull. “Kyle and I were sleeping at the time and were awoken by the sound of his head hitting the floor, and then hysterical piercing screams,” Amurri wrote. “He suffered a fractured skull and bleeding on his brain, and was transported by ambulance to Yale Medical Center where I spent two harrowing days with him to receive emergency care and further testing.”


Baby Major has made a full recovery and has no long-term health risks from the incident, but Amurri explains that she has possibly struggled with PTSD and Postpartum depression following the traumatic events. Although she hasn’t been diagnosed, Amurri painfully describes the intense trauma and anxiety she has experienced following the incident. Amurri feared how her online following would react, and if she would be labeled as a bad or unfit mother.


“Unfortunately, trying to push through these experiences and feelings, keep up with work and with my parental responsibilities, has just pushed me deeper in the quicksand. I’ve been easily overwhelmed, and between follow up doctor visits for Major, and the stresses of learning our rhythm as a family of four, I have felt most of my other responsibilities slipping through the cracks. I think I need to take some things off of my plate. It’s time to really face this all and find a solution,” she wrote.

While Amurri is taking time off from her blog, she posted on Instagram to thank her supporters and her thoughts on parenting--and more specifically--observing how others parent.


“Parenthood is not a competition. Nobody gets an award at the end of all of it for doing it the best or most perfect way. All that matters is how we make our children feel, how we feel about them, and how we feel about ourselves as parents. To those who have expressed judgement, cruelty, and criticism of me, my choices, or my fragility during this time- I'm not going to justify myself to you. But I sincerely wish that 2017 brings you enough self love and confidence that you no longer feel the need to tear down another person during their darkest moment.”


Even in a dark time, Amurri ends on a serious high note. We hope her post will remind others that no parent is perfect, and oftentimes they are battling their own insecurities. Let’s not add to the hate, and find a way to help.

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